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Oct
5

Good & Angry — David Powlison (a book review)

Good & Angry — David Powlison (a book review) Good & Angry: Redeeming Anger, Irritation, Complaining & Bitterness — by David Powlison (a review by Israel Wayne) As an author of a book on anger myself, I was intrigued to see David Powlison’s take on this important topic. I have read many books on anger, and have been impressed by very few of them. Many have created a victim status for those who express habitual anger. The goal seems to be that we need to excuse people from their harmful behavior, because they just can’t help what they do. These books may make someone feel better, in the short term, but the devastation of ruined relationships will continue. In the end, people who struggle with addictive anger patterns need hope that they can change and that life can better. Telling someone, “We all have hang-ups, so don’t stress about yours,” isn’t kind, or healing. It’s actually infinitely cruel, in the long run. I sometimes suspect that such authors end up promoting hopeless advice like: “Just forgive yourself and don’t be so hard on yourself,” because they have not found any true solutions in their own life. As a Christian, I am always hopeful that another Christian author will appeal to the only fixed reference point in the universe: The nature and character of God as He has expressed Himself in the Bible. My hopes are usually dashed. But not because most Christian authors don’t quote the Bible. They do. It’s just that they do so in a peripheral way. It’s almost like Jesus is a plug-in to a Humanistic worldview software program. The main solution is to either try harder (through your own human effort – which is a sure way to fail), or to abandon hope altogether. In “Good & Angry,” I was delightfully surprised to note that David Powlison appealed to the wisdom of God as THE final source of truth on the topic of overcoming anger. The book is not merely a litany of random Bible verses, however, instead it is thoughtful and practical in its application of God’s specific teaching on this matter. David does a good job in sorting out the difference between what we might call “righteous indignation,” and harmful human anger that destroys relationships and hurts people. He describes the root sources of anger, and provides Biblically-based solutions for breaking free from the anger habit. This book will on a very short list of books that I will recommend for those...
Mar
7

Was Jesus a Socialist?

Was Jesus a Socialist? I was asked to speak at a Christian conference in Ontario, Canada on the topic of “Biblical Economics.” The lecture was going along just fine until I mentioned that from a Biblical standpoint, the civil government was NOT to be involved in health care in any way. That’s when things got a bit hostile. People began yelling out objections in the middle of my presentation. We went back in forth for about five minutes in a kind of impromptu “open-forum” until I finally suggested we continue with the presentation and I’d stay after to answer questions. About 45 people crowded the stage afterward and in rapid succession endeavored to find any kind of defense whatsoever for my claim (that I had also made) that any form of Socialism (forced redistribution of wealth by the government), was immoral and contrary to Scripture. One lady exclaimed, “I don’t know anyone who doesn’t support universal government-funded healthcare. Everyone in my church supports it. Our pastors all support it! Heck, Jesus was a Socialist!” I often hear this claim that Jesus and the Apostles (and the rest of the early church) were all Socialists who supported living in a kind of Egalitarian Utopia where no one had private property, everything was held in common and all things were totally shared and equal. Thankfully, one of the great Economic experts in our day and age, Lawrence Reed, the President of the Foundation for Economic Education, has debunked this myth in a new FREE e-book / audiobook entitled, Rendering Unto Caesar: Was Jesus a Socialist?. I am very pleased to be able to share this resource with you, and I strongly encourage you to read it and share it with others. This would make a great family discussion with your children. Our goal at ChristianWorldview.net is to encourage you to think and live Biblically, and we are grateful for this excellent new tool to help us to “take every thought captive” as it relates to Economics and so-called, “Christian Socialism.” For more resources, please check out our Economics page.   Israel Wayne is an Author and Conference Speaker and Director of Family Renewal, LLC. He is also the Site Editor for...
Apr
10

The Henry Morris Study Bible – Review

My family has recently finished a complete study through the Bible, verse by verse, which has taken us over 6 years to complete. In addition to reading the text of Scripture, we have utilized many other supplementary resources as well. I describe a bit of our approach to studying the Bible as a family HERE. As we have cycled back around to Genesis, there are a couple of resources that we have found to be invaluable. One of the resources I highly recommend is Ken Ham‘s Foundations DVD set, and Answers Academy Curriculum from Answers in Genesis. However, for the actual study of the text itself, I have found no better resource than the verse-by-verse commentary provided by Dr. Henry Morris Study Bible (the co-founder of the modern Creationist movement). I don’t know if anyone ever studied the book of Genesis more intently in one lifetime than Dr. Morris. His commitment to Biblical authority and his deep understanding of the world of Science make this Bible a wonderful lifetime investment. Available in beautiful genuine leather, this KJV translation masterpiece features over 10,000 study notes. This 2,215 page volume uses a 10 point font and a two column format making it easy to read. Inside you will also find the Words of Christ in red, 22 total appendices, full color maps and a concordance. Personally, I would never want to teach through the book of Genesis without this unique resource in my hands. I highly recommend it to your family as a family heirloom to pass on from generation to generation. Israel Wayne is an Author and Conference Speaker and the Director of Family Renewal,...
Mar
17

30 Books that Changed My Life

30 Books that Changed My Life What you read shapes your life. It is a given that the Bible has changed my life more than any other book. However, I have been blessed to have read a lot of books by amazing people who helped to develop who I am today. I am going to share with you my personal collection of books that have been most influential in shaping my life and worldview. I have tried to pick only one book from each author, although many of these authors have written numerous books that impacted me. These are not listed in any particular order of importance. Absolute Surrender — Andrew Murray Cost of Discipleship — Dietrich Bonhoeffer True Spirituality — Francis Schaeffer Mere Christianity – C.S. Lewis Pilgrim’s Progress – John Bunyan Recapture the Wonder — Ravi Zacharias The Lie— Ken Ham Right from Wrong — Josh McDowell I Don’t Have Enough Faith to be an Atheist — Norman Geisler & Frank Turek How Now Shall We Live — Charles Colson & Nancy Pearcey Tortured for Christ — Richard Wurmbrand Revolution in World Missions — K.P. Yohannan Experiencing God — Henry Blackaby & Claude King Walk of Repentance — Steve Gallagher Understanding the Times — Jeff Myers & David Noebel God’s Smuggler — Brother Andrew Knowing God — J.I. Packer Seeking Him — Nancy Leigh DeMoss and Tim Grissom Pursuit of Holiness — Jerry Bridges Knowledge of the Holy — A.W. Tozer Why Revival Tarries — Leonard Ravenhill The Holy Spirit — R.A. Torrey The Holiness of God — R.C. Sproul Basic Christianity — John Stott Disciplines of a Godly Man — R. Kent Hughes The Cross and the Switchblade — David Wilkerson The Heart of Homeschooling — Christopher J. Klicka Is Public Education Necessary — Samuel Blumenfeld Shepherding a Child’s Heart — Tedd Tripp Foxe’s Book of Martyrs — John Foxe Israel Wayne is an Author and Conference Speaker. He is the Director of Family Renewal,...
Sep
5

The Death of Truth (Understanding Postmodernism)

If you have been hearing about these terms, “Modern” and “Postmodern” but aren’t certain where to begin, The Death of Truth, (Dennis McCallum, General Editor),  is a great place to start. The topics are dealt with in a scholarly manner, but are explained in an easy enough manner for the common person to understand. One of the most helpful aspects of the book are the wonderful charts, that give a great visual aid to the comparison of these worldviews. This book contrasts the worldviews of Modernism against Postmodernism as they apply to: Health Care, Literature, Education, History, Psychotherapy, Law, Science, and Religion. If there is a downside to the book, it may be that some of the authors tend to defend Modernism a bit too much in their zeal to show the imbalance of its rebellious progeny: Postmodernism. This shows up the most in the chapters on education and health. In health, the author seems so opposed to any form on alternative medicine that I think he goes a bit far and throws the baby out with the bath water. Not all alternative medical approaches are “new age” or bogus superstition. In education, there is more credence given to the modern approach to education that is warranted. Modernist education wasn’t Biblical either. On a good note though, they do have a great explanation of the views of Multiculturalism and the real relatvisitic motives behind the facade. With those disclaimers aside, I really think this book is a very useful tool for anyone who wants to understand the culture in which we live. Ideas have origins and destinations. This book does a good job of filling in the gaps between the two. http://www.xenos.org/ministries/crossroads/dot.htm  Bethany House Copyright 1996 ISBN #1-5561-724-0 288 pages. On a scale of 1-5, I’d give this a 4...

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