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Mar
17

30 Books that Changed My Life

30 Books that Changed My Life What you read shapes your life. It is a given that the Bible has changed my life more than any other book. However, I have been blessed to have read a lot of books by amazing people who helped to develop who I am today. I am going to share with you my personal collection of books that have been most influential in shaping my life and worldview. I have tried to pick only one book from each author, although many of these authors have written numerous books that impacted me. These are not listed in any particular order of importance. Absolute Surrender — Andrew Murray Cost of Discipleship — Dietrich Bonhoeffer True Spirituality — Francis Schaeffer Mere Christianity – C.S. Lewis Pilgrim’s Progress – John Bunyan Recapture the Wonder — Ravi Zacharias The Lie— Ken Ham Right from Wrong — Josh McDowell I Don’t Have Enough Faith to be an Atheist — Norman Geisler & Frank Turek How Now Shall We Live — Charles Colson & Nancy Pearcey Tortured for Christ — Richard Wurmbrand Revolution in World Missions — K.P. Yohannan Experiencing God — Henry Blackaby & Claude King Walk of Repentance — Steve Gallagher Understanding the Times — Jeff Myers & David Noebel God’s Smuggler — Brother Andrew Knowing God — J.I. Packer Seeking Him — Nancy Leigh DeMoss and Tim Grissom Pursuit of Holiness — Jerry Bridges Knowledge of the Holy — A.W. Tozer Why Revival Tarries — Leonard Ravenhill The Holy Spirit — R.A. Torrey The Holiness of God — R.C. Sproul Basic Christianity — John Stott Disciplines of a Godly Man — R. Kent Hughes The Cross and the Switchblade — David Wilkerson The Heart of Homeschooling — Christopher J. Klicka Is Public Education Necessary — Samuel Blumenfeld Shepherding a Child’s Heart — Tedd Tripp Foxe’s Book of Martyrs — John Foxe Israel Wayne is an Author and Conference Speaker. He is the Director of Family Renewal,...
Mar
11

Accomodation or Confrontation?

Accomodation or Confrontation? I recently watched, once again, a video presentation of Dr. Francis Schaeffer‘s last public meeting before he died in 1984. I was stunned, again, by the precision of his insights into his era, and ours. Dr. Schaeffer’s last two books, The Great Evangelical Disaster and A Christian Manifesto, were nothing short of prophetic. As he approached his death, after fifty years of his ministry, he observed that Evangelicalism over that time could be summarized primarily by one term: Accommodation. There is a syncretism, a relativism within the Western church that accepts and capitulates to the trends of the secular society around it. Dr. Schaeffer had pointed out in his previous book, The God Who Is There, that the true, confessing Church is the last holdout against despair in any given culture. The gospel has a restraining influence on a culture, like a dam holding back the flood of secularism. When worldliness and accommodation have infiltrated the church, a culture has gone as low as it can go morally. Dr. Schaeffer summarized the evangelical situation in 1984 by saying, “The grossest form of worldliness is conforming to the form of worldliness that exists in it’s own generation. If that is true, then we must say that Evangelicalism is as worldly as it can possibly be!” What Should We Then Do? The solution given at that time was that young evangelicals (and old ones) should rise up and confront the worldly church with the truth of God’s Word. (John 17:3, 2 Thess. 3:14-15) More than trying to change the culture, Dr. Schaeffer said the more immediate task at hand was to seek reformation within the church. After Schaeffer’s death, there was an increase in young Christian leaders who really understood the importance of, as Schaeffer would say, “The lordship of Jesus Christ over the totality of life.” Many, if not most, of the ministries that are really making an impact in our world today were inspired, to a great extent, by the message of Francis Schaeffer. In our day, we see passing on of many of the older leaders in the Christian world. In recent memory we’ve seen the home-goings of leaders like Adrian Rogers, Charles Colson, Jerry Falwell, Elisabeth Elliot, D. James Kennedy, and others. Who will take the baton in the next generation and carry the truth of the gospel without compromise? Truth is, by definition, exclusive. To claim that something is true, the antithesis of it must be, according to the Law of...
Mar
4

College vs. Christianity? — Collegiate Impact

As someone who works in the field of Christian Apologetics, I often hear the sad stories of students who, after a semester or two of college, declare themselves to be Atheists or Agnostics. Many Christian parents are wondering how to navigate these difficult waters with their young adults. I want to introduce to you, Dave Warn, and Collegiate Impact, a Christian campus ministry that is here to help. — Israel Wayne Israel Wayne: How did you develop an interest in serving college students? Dave Warn: I became a follower of Jesus during my second year of college. I was lost and felt empty without purpose in life when someone shared the gospel with me. After I came to faith I began to realize that I had a growing desire to help college students find the Lord and grow in their faith, just like someone had helped me. I’ve never regretted the decision to serve Christ full-time in the world of higher education. Israel Wayne: What is the overall vision / mission for Collegiate Impact? Dave Warn: Collegiate Impact exists to see hearts ignited in their love for Christ and campuses transformed. Once believers are revived, experiencing the “streams of living water” that Jesus promised, they become a potent force on campus. Then, as these believers seek God together, a greater move of the Spirit is possible and this is how an entire campus can be influenced. While ministering at the University of Wisconsin, we experienced the Lord move in this way and fruit was dramatic. Israel Wayne: What are some of the greatest dangers that Christian students face on a college campus? Dave Warn: The greatest danger on many campuses is to adopt the prevailing campus mindset. On a Christian college there may be a mindset of apathy toward serving the Lord wholeheartedly. The campus atmosphere is more about hanging out with friends and getting good grades. On a public university the campus mindset usually does not include God so it is tempting to completely leave Jesus out of the conversation. Of course there are further implications of adopting the prevailing mindset on either Christian and secular schools such as sexual promiscuity, worldliness, and pride. Israel Wayne: How can parents help their students to be prepared for what they will face once they enter higher education? Dave Warn: First, parents need to assess the youth ministry their son or daughter is involved in at church. There are two fundamental questions that need to be asked about their current youth group experience. First, has the hook-up culture of the local public...

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