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Feb
18

The Vow — Kim and Krickitt Carpenter (Book Review)

The Carpenter’s relationship was an all-American love story, complete with a romantic courtship and marriage, followed by a “happily-ever-after” ending. That is until they were both nearly killed in a dramatic car accident the day before Thanksgiving in 1993. They had only been married for three months. To make a long story short, Krickitt emerged from the accident with no memory of Kim whatsoever. She had lost several years of her memory completely, and had no recollection of ever meeting, let alone marrying, Kim. The book details Krickitt’s struggle to come back from the brink of death, and their desire to maintain a marriage, that no longer held shared memories to help hold it together. This book would be a great read for anyone who is dealing with head trauma in their family, is experiencing marital conflicts, wants to have a successful marriage, or for anyone who simply loves a good story. Kim and Krickitt are very honest about their own struggles and failures and I appreciated that their book wasn’t overly simplistic. They demonstrated that life is sometimes hard in the long run and everything doesn’t get neatly solved in a half an hour. Kim was committed to his wife, even though she didn’t love him anymore, even though she didn’t LIKE him anymore, even though she didn’t even remember him anymore. Krickitt had to learn to trust God to give her love for a man that she no longer knew. Their true story is an inspiration because it shows ordinary, everyday people, being heroic simply be doing the right thing; day after difficult day. The book was made into a movie that hit the theatres in early 2012. http://www.thevow-movie.com/ I have not seen the movie, but from what I can gather, there is little to no emphasis on their Christian faith reflected in the new film. To hear a bit about the real story, check out this interview: On a scale of 1-5, I’d give this a 3.75 overall. 224 Pages. The Vow (The Kim & Krickitt Carpenter Story) By Kim & Krickitt Carpenter, with John Perry (and Dana Wilkerson Copyright 2000 & 2012 Broadman & Holman ISBN#0-8054-2130-0 ISBN#...
Feb
17

Worship: Who Are You to Say What it Is?!

Worship: Who Are You to Say What it Is?! I saw a post on a friend’s Facebook wall the other day. There was a discussion about worship styles (traditional vs. contemporary) and someone made the statement, “Well, who are you to say what is worship and what isn’t?” I can’t get that out of my mind. The person making the statement was implying (I believe) that there is no objective standard by which to determine what is, or is not, proper worship. That is simply not true. On the other hand, WE as mere humans are NOT that plumb line. The scripture says “God is Spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in Spirit and in Truth.” (John 4:24) What is True Worship? True worship must be intellectual. We must love our God with all of our minds (Luke 10:27). It should not be shallow or meaningless repetition (Matthew 6:7), but should be directed to God, and must reflect accurately who He is and what He has done. True worship must be Christ-centered. There is no other name that has been given under heaven whereby we must be saved (Acts 4:12). Apart from the Lordship of Jesus Christ over the totality of life, all worship is devoid of purpose. True worship must be heart-felt. We should not fall into the trap of going through the motions in an attempt to psych ourselves up emotionally, or trying to impress God with our stalwart devotion. We are to LOVE God with ALL of our heart (Luke 10:27). Worship is not about what we like. It is not about style. It is about worshiping God in the way that He wants to be worshiped. Worship is about giving all that we are, for all that He is. Worship should not be a narcissistic expression of us and how great we are. In worship (which is much more than just music or singing), we should respond to God out of a heart of gratitude for how great He is, and for what He has done for us. While we cannot help but express our thankfulness to God in culturally diverse ways (we are, in fact, culturally diverse), true worship is ultimately not about culture, or Art, or expressions of talent (although these factors are sometimes involved). Worship is about the God who is there. It is about knowing Him, and being known by Him. Worship should never be divorced from sound theology. Worship should not be divorced from church history. Worship...
Feb
15

Dealing with Our Doubts

Dealing with Our Doubts Sometimes even faithful Christian experience times of doubt and uncertainty. This is not cause to lose hope! Rather, this is just a reminder to turn to the Savior and be patient. Wait for God’s answer. God is always working, even when you can’t see His plan. This is a great little clip from my friend, Dan Jarvis, a pastor and blogger, on dealing with your doubts as a Christian: Asaph said in Psalm 77: 6I will remember my song in the night; I will meditate with my heart, And my spirit ponders: 7Will the Lord reject forever? And will He never be favorable again? 8Has His lovingkindness ceased forever? Has His promise come to an end forever? 9Has God forgotten to be gracious, Or has He in anger withdrawn His compassion?Selah. 10Then I said, “It is my grief, That the right hand of the Most High has changed.” 11I shall remember the deeds of the LORD; Surely I will remember Your wonders of old. It is in remembering the faithfulness of God in the past, that we have strength and hope for our future. Israel Wayne is an Author and Conference Speaker and Director of Family Renewal, LLC. He is the Site Editor for...
Feb
9

I Don’t Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist (Book Review)

I Don’t Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist (Book Review) I Don’t Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist, by Norman Geisler and Frank Turek,  is a modern-day Christian apologetics classic. I have to place this book in the top ten books written so far on regarding understanding a Christian philosophy of of all of life. This is a very linear, comprehensive work that seeks to answer the major questions of life and religion. The book begins with Epistemology and the fact that truth can be known. It then moves to Cosmology and addresses the origins of the universe. It addresses the questions of morality, the existence of miracles and the supernatural, the historicity of Jesus Christ and His claims to divinity, the compilation and canonization of the New Testament texts, the bodily resurrection of Christ, and includes some good appendix chapters that address things like “If God, Why Evil?” and “Isn’t That Just Your Interpretation?” Another outline could be: Origin:Where Did We Come From? Identity: Who Are We? Meaning: Why Are We Here? Morality: How Should We Live? Destiny: Where Are We Going? To give you an idea of the general acceptance of the overall soundness of this book, it is endorsed by: Ravi Zacharias, Josh McDowell, Lee Strobel, Phillip E. Johnson, Cal Thomas, William A. Dembski, Hank Hanegraaf, John Ankerberg & J. Buudziszeski. 448 pages. On a scale of 1-5, I’d give this a 4.5 overall. Review by Israel...

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© Israel Wayne.